Woo hoo!: The Timekeepers’ War Update

Finally!

Just a quick update to let you know that the documents I needed to sign for the release of The Timekeepers’ War have finally arrived. Apparently it takes five weeks to get USPS priority mail across the border into Canada… Who knew?

Anyway, now that we’ve got that out of the way I can mail everything to the printer and we can get this show back on the road. Hopefully five weeks isn’t a typical delivery time… But the good news is now that this is out of the way, your limited edition hardcover copies will be signed and numbered! Contact me if you’re interested in purchasing one, as the limited editions will not be available online (as far as I know).

I will keep you posted once the printers actually have everything in hand and we have a new official release scheduled. Thanks for reading!

The Edits Continue

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Editing. I think I’m actually starting to enjoy the process. Although, by the time The Timekeepers’ War is actually released, I’m going to be so sick of it that I will never actually read the final version cover to cover. Well, maybe in a few years. You guys will have to do it for me. And please don’t tell me if you find any errors at this point, because I may do something drastic!

No, I’m not at that point yet.

But I’m continually amazed at how much a manuscript can change and still come out essentially the same story. It is incredible. I barely recognize my first draft anymore. Who is this flighty, overly descriptive show off? It’s embarrassing! At least no one else will have to read that version every again. Unless I post some before and after paragraphs…

The last time I wrote about editing (read the post here) I explained how I had received a sample of the kind of revisions I will be going through with my editor. Having already gone through the process once before (read about that experience here) I expected that this would be a fairly superficial once-over to make sure there were no hidden typos or formatting errors.

Ha! That was just my conceited writer’s brain talking. I don’t know about you, but when my writer’s brain is not telling me how terrible I am and that I will never make it, it’s telling me I’m amazing and can basically sit on my behind and wait for the accolades to come pouring in. It’s a little bi-polar.

Here’s the thing. No matter how many times you edit something, there is more to fix. Always. Part of that is because everyone’s style is different; some people prefer brevity and some detail, some focus on pace and others on world-building. The important thing about working with an editor is to make sure you both have a similar vision for what the end product will look like. Because you can edit a manuscript back and forth indefinitely if you are not working towards a common goal.

Luckily, my editor and I are on the same page. And that she has a much better idea of how to achieve this end goal than I (apparently) do. Amy, my editor, will be going through my manuscript in detail–just like she did with the first three chapters. But first, she had a little project for me…

She did a search for some commonly over-used words. These culprits are (in my case) “then,” “just,” “look,” and “but.” She asked me to go through my manuscript using the Find feature in Microsoft Word, and to look at every instance in which I had used one of these words (which means going through my MS four separate times, focusing on one word at a time) and to delete them when they were unnecessary, and to rework sentences to avoid them when possible.

Not that you should never use them, but I was grossly overusing them. I used the word “then” over 1500 times in a 130,000 word novel. The word “but” was used over 900 times (this number is somewhat inflated, because the count includes words that contain the letters but, like “button” or “butter,” neither of which are words every used in my novel… so I’m not sure why those are my examples, but you get the point). “Look” in it’s various forms (including “looked” and “looking,” etc.) was used over 500 times. And “just” was used about 250 times. And I never noticed, and none of my beta-readers ever noticed. But once she pointed it out it was impossible to ignore.

The thing about these words is that they are largely unnecessary, particularly “then” and “just.” I was able to get my count of “then” down to only 66 legitimate usages. From 1500. That is ridiculous.

The other trims weren’t quite as drastic, but I cut my usage of “look” and “just” by better than half. “Look” now comes in at 216 and “just” at 126. So the fast majority of “then” and “just” I was simply able to delete and the the sentence didn’t miss them. It’s basically the difference between “Then I opened the door” and “I opened the door” or “Just wait a minute!” and “Wait a minute!” These are simplified sentences, obviously, but the idea is the same. I cut every instance of “then” where the sequence of events was not critical, and in most of the places it cropped up in conversations. “Just” usually came up in conversations as well, because we use it often when we speak. But when we are reading a conversation, it usually isn’t necessary to the context.

“Look” I did not often eliminate, but I replaced with synonyms. Look is a very bland, undescriptive word. “I looked at him” does not have the same weight as “I glared at him.” And there are a lot of different ways to “look”: you can glance, peek, peer, glower, regard, survey, scan, etc. I tried to use more appropriate synonyms, which then allowed me to delete qualifying sentences that followed the “look.” There are also the other kinds of looks: expression, mien, air, etc. which I replaced. Not all of them, because sometimes “look” is the most appropriate word. But I really went through and considered if I was saying what I wanted to say in the best way that I could.

I am infinitely more happy with the way it reads right now, and Amy has barely touched it. She’s just guided me. Now she’s got her hands on it, though, and I’m prepared for some serious fat-trimming. Interestingly, I found myself strangely unable to eliminate my usage of the word “but.” So I have left these changes in Amy’s capable hands in hopes that she will guide me further.

Every time I finish a step like this I come out feeling like a better writer. I feel like I’m learning something, and that my novel is evolving into the best writing that I am capable of. It makes me very excited to take what I’ve learned (hopefully I retain some of it) and apply it to the next novel that I write. Much of it will be directly applicable to the sequel to The Timekeepers’ War, Children of Bathora.

So there you have it. Does anyone have similar experiences with their writing? Any weird words that keep popping up without you realizing it? How do you edit? Please share!

SF Themes and Ideas: Frozen Viruses

light-virus-1I might be coming late to the party on this one… but did you know that viruses can survive being frozen, become thawed, and live to infect another day?

This has been in the news for the last couple of weeks: giant virus comes back to life, etc. etc. But, “according to the researchers, the revival of the virus could mean there may be other threats to human or animal life hidden in the permafrost.”

So this is fucking scary. Also, totally intriguing. Any SF writers/readers that have come across this theme before? Does it make you think of possible themes in future work? I know it’s been done before. But has it been done well? And should it be done again? Let me know in the comments 🙂

eReaders… I’m finally joining everyone in the 21st C.

Okay. I finally did it. I’ve ordered a Kindle Paperwhite. Don’t tell me I’ve made the wrong choice; it’s too late now.

I have stubbornly avoided getting on the eBook bandwagon. I covet my moments with real books in my hands. The last thing I need in  my life is more “screen time.” I need the soft shush of pages turning, the sweet smell of ink and book-glue and paper (side note: anyone else in love with the smell of used book stores? the older books get, the better they smell). I need the feel of them in my hands to truly enjoy reading.

At least, that’s what I’ve been telling myself. Because that’s how it’s been for me for the last 30 years. Actually, I’m not sure that my owning an eReader is going to change any of that. I will always love paper books. However, I am willing to make some concessions to my ideals for the sake of three things…

1) I would like to be able to view my own books in their electronic form for the sake of proofing, editing, and plain old curiosity. Although I trust my publisher to make my upcoming novel as professional as it can be, I am venturing into the world of self-publishing for some of my novellas, short-stories, etc. and I need to be able to view them as they will be viewed by others.

2) There are so many lovely self-published and small press authors out there whom I would love to support. Many of them only publish eBooks, which is one reason I feel I need an eReader. But even those who offer paperbacks as well, I would like to be able to purchase in eBook format. Not that I wouldn’t love to have a huge library of hardcopy indie books. But eBooks make the difference between me being able to support three or four authors for the same price as one, if I limit myself to paperbacks. I want to share the love a bit 🙂

3) My wallet will (hopefully) thank me. Not only will I be able to spread my dollars around a bit more to show my Indie love, but I will hopefully be able to save some money on traditionally published books as well. There are some books that I am curious about, but just can’t bring myself to spend the money on. If the eBook is significantly cheaper, I may discover authors that I would have otherwise avoided out of uncertainty. I never hold back from buying a book that I know I love, but I’d like to take a few more risks and not feel like I’m breaking the bank.

So there you have it. My rationale… What do you think? Do you have and love your eReader? Are you a stubborn old goat, like me, who clings to paper books like the precious relics they are? Do you have an eBook that you think I might enjoy? Drop me a line, and post links in the comments. I will review sci-fi and fantasy on Cat’s Liminal Space, and others on Goodreads and Amazon.

Indies Unlimited: Kirkus Review discussion

Following yesterday’s post on paying for reviews, I’d just like to share this discussion from “Indies Unlimited.” The series of posts specifically targets Kirkus Indie Reviews and includes an interview and guest post from Kirkus Indie Editor, Karen Schechner. Having read some of the vehement opinions regarding Kirkus Reviews from the indie author community, I am almost afraid that using one would spell an untimely death for a new author. Good to know 😉 Still, it is a very interesting conversation and one I have only just dipped my toes into. Thank you to Francis Guenette at “Disappearing in Plain Sight” for sharing the link. If you haven’t checked out her blog yet, please do! Guenette offers many invaluable insights into the world of indie publishing.

Dilemmas of the Small Press Author: Paying for Reviews

Does your book stand out in a crowd?
Does your book stand out in a crowd?

Another day, another way I realize I don’t know what I’m doing…

One of the (many, I’m sure) perks of signing with a big publishing house is that they have go-to people to write reviews of your novel before it is even released. These reviews can appear on your book jacket and in promotional material months before the first copy is in your hot little hands. It is an aspect of the publishing industry that I completely took for granted as a reader. I often browse the high-sung praises of a book by review agencies, other well-respected authors, magazine/newspaper editors, etc. before I purchase a book. There is no doubt that these reviewers are paid for their time in reading and reviewing the work, and soliciting professional reviews is one of the many jobs that a publisher takes on when they sign an author.

So what is one to do when one chooses to publish through small or independent presses? I knew that signing with a small press publisher would mean that I would be doing a lot of the marketing legwork on my own. But to be honest, I didn’t have a clear plan for what that might actually look like in practice. I was so focused on finding a publisher that I didn’t look too far into the murky future beyond. Now that I’m popping up on the other side I’m beginning to realize that this whole marketing thing is going to be an uphill battle!

One of the concepts that is new to me, but which has been around for decades, is the paid-review. There are companies out there who offer professional review services (here is a good link with some examples), similar to what the big publishing houses have access to, but which are geared towards small press and independent press authors. Now, I’m not talking about the shady business of paying for fake 5 star reviews on amazon.com or Goodreads, though there are certainly those kinds of ethically questionable companies out there. I’m talking about paying for a real objective, balanced review by a professional. Services range from about $150-$500 for a review and various marketing packages.

In theory, it seems like a sound investment, particularly as I am not footing the bill for any publication costs. If I’m going to spend money on my book, it might as well be in advertising, right? But the feedback I’ve come across is inconsistent. Some authors swear by these and similar marketing strategies, and some swear they’re nothing but a waste of money. The advice from my publisher is to avoid the higher priced ones as, in his experience, review services are more expensive than they are effective.

But there is a part of me that wants to believe that, if my book is good enough, a quality professional review or two may make the difference. Is this line of thinking over-simplified and naive? I don’t know. Do any of you have opinions or experiences to share? Please comment! Also, if there are any book bloggers out there who would like to take a stab at The Timekeepers’ War, please email me at sc.jensen[at]outlook[dot]com with a link to your blog. I can’t pay you, but I can promise a free review copy!

See here for a sneak peek of The Timekeepers’ War by S.C. Jensen, coming Summer 2014.

Living the Dream??

Hello out there, if anyone is still reading.

I apologize for how negligent I have been with my blog updates; I’ve had a lot going on. Actually a lot. I’m not just making that up.

But in the mean time, magic has happened and I’m super excited to announce that I am going to be published! I am looking at a June/July release date… so start saving those pennies! I hope to have links up soon for e-book and paperback purchases. I am looking for sci-fi reviewers to take a look, so if you’re interested, please message me and I’ll hook you up with a review copy. I plan to write a retrospective on how this came about, for those who have been following since the beginning… I just need a moment to collect my thoughts. Please leave any questions/comments below and I will try to address them in my next post!

Cat