“The Midwife” by S.C. Jensen: NYC Midnight Flash Fiction Challenge

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The results are in for round three of the NYC Midnight Flash Fiction challenge. After scoring first in round one and third in round two, I was feeling pretty confident about round three. I was a little nervous, because I knew competition would be stiff. But the assignment that I received was right up my alley with Genre: Thriller–Location: a radio tower–Object: ice skates. The piece I wrote was my favourite of the three, by far. It was the most “me.” I was totally in my element.

And guess what?

I didn’t even place in the top half of my group! That’s right. Not even an honourable mentions, when I was pretty sure that I had one of those coveted top four spots in the bag, haha.

We don’t get to read the other entries, but they did post the synopses of the top eight pieces for each group. I’m not entirely sure where I went wrong. Based on the synopses of the higher scoring pieces, I may have been slightly off genre. Or perhaps I didn’t do anything wrong, and the competition was just that much steeper in round three.

Either way, I still had a blast with this challenge. Now I get to enjoy a bit of a break before the NYC Short Story Challenge starts in January 2018. I thought I’d share my not-so-winning piece with in the Story Laboratory ! Head over and check it out. Don’t forget to let me know what you think in the comments!

7 thoughts on ““The Midwife” by S.C. Jensen: NYC Midnight Flash Fiction Challenge

    1. Here’s their definition of horror:

      Horror
      A story intended to provoke an emotional, psychological, or physical fear response in the audience. Horror stories frequently contain supernatural elements, though not always, and the central menace may serve as a metaphor for the fears of society. Common elements: eerie atmosphere, morbid themes, heightened suspense, focus on death and evil, uncanny situations and persons. Horror books include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Stephen King’s It. Horror films include The Exorcist (1973) and Poltergeist (1982).

      So I probably did veer to close to that!

    1. Thanks! And yes, reading their definition of horror (posted in the above comment), I think you’re probably right. I still love it, though, and will probably use it for something else in the future 🙂

  1. I can see how the crossover to horror could be infered, but the “clear and present”, or immediate danger was quite evident. Genre topic aside, it was pretty well told. I was hooked from the get-go. But then, this kind of story is right up my alley.

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