Flash Fiction: “Ocean Things”

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Flash Fiction Challenge
Prompt: Tide pools
Limit 500 words

“Ocean Things” by S.C. Jensen

Annemette followed the tide. The rocks and barnacles cut into her flesh like paring knives, peeling her from the bottom up. Her ankles were thick with water, as if they sucked in the sea, held it. Her body was a sponge. Full of holes. Full of water. Full of life. Annemette followed the tide.

For nearly a year, she had been stumbling barefoot across the craggy western shoreline of the island. A monthly pilgrimage. She sought a place that none but the truly desperate could find. She sought the Drowning Hole.

Home. I’m going home.

She chased the tide, relishing the cool damp of the rocky outcropping and the fire of salt in her wounds. The pain was good. It reminded her of where she had been and where she was going. It will be over soon.

The water moved so quickly now. Moonlit waves licked at her, taunting her, drawing her nearer. With each step she longed to feel the kiss of the sea against her heavy limbs, longed for the weightlessness of water.

But her toes, bruised and broken, crushed seafoam instead. Pink, frothy footprints followed her. She moved so slowly now. The lean, graceful body she had loved so much was gone. Disintegrated, in a matter of months. She was a bloated corpse, walking. Still, Annemette followed the tide.

“Oh.” A crack, like lightning, broke through her. The salty burning in her feet was obliterated by something much older. A primordial thing. She fell. It’s coming.

“Ooooooh—” She let the thing crawl through her body and out her throat in a great, ululating wail. Her fingernails cracked and bled and grasped at stone. She watched the rivulets of red running into the tiny tide pools; she watched the blood dissipate into clear, crisp ocean water. Almost there.

Dragging herself forward now, on hands and knees, Annemette followed the tide.

A yawning blackness stretched out before her. Seafoam and swash surrounded it, were consumed by it. The Drowning Hole. Mysterious eddies and currents, sucking and swirling, down, down, down. A place that mortals came to die.

Death is what draws them to this place, the ocean things. Things like Annemette. One year ago she had pulled herself, black and dripping, from this very hole. Her body had felt impossibly heavy. She clung to the rocky shoal, the tide pulling away from her. Abandoning her in this foreign place, in this foreign flesh.

Annemette dragged herself to the edge of the tide pool and peered into the depths.

“Sisters,” she said. “I’ve come home.” The primeval aching tore through her body again. This time she bore its weight in silence. Dark eyes stared up at her from the pool, pale green faces floating upwards. Long-fingered hands broke the surface first, grasping at her. Pulling, like the tide.

“You’ve come, sister.” Hair like kelp and shark-like flesh, they rose. “And you have brought us life.”

“I have brought you life.” Her swollen body heaved, and the creatures pulled her into the water. Down, down, down. Annemette followed the tide.

 

 

Update: Children of Bathora

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Ahhh, editing. That wonderful time in your novel’s life when you must juggle wild elation and crippling self-doubt while trying to stay sane…

I’m excited to report that the editing of The Children of Bathora is going well. After discussions with my development editor, I’ve decided to completely restructure the thing.

Yes, that is as awful as it sounds.

Considering I thought I was closer to the line edit stage, the initial epiphany felt more like a slap in the face than your standard choir-of-angels moment. But, after tearing it apart and putting it together again, I know this is the right decision and Book Two in The Timekeepers Trilogy is going to be much better for it. The pacing is better, the character development is stronger, and the stakes are higher. I’m happier.

I think this is one of those aspects of the writing process that writers don’t talk about as much as we should. I’ve often waited anxiously for the next title in a favourite series to be released, counting down the months and sometimes years until it is expected, and getting increasingly irritated as that date flies by and I’m still left waiting. Now I’m stuck on the other side of that battle. I want to make this sequel worthy of the readers who loved The Timekeepers’ War and I feel immense pressure to finish it before interest wanes.

So to those of you who are still waiting, thank you. It means a lot to me, and I’m not going to let you down. I’m going to be better about updating the page, too, so everyone knows where I’m at in the process.

Feel free to comment with suggestions for what you’d like to see on the page, as well. Flash Fiction? Book Reviews? Craft Articles? What are you interested in?

Take care out there. Happy reading and writing!